Kate hails wildlife photography award as reminder to take care of the planet

The Duchess of Cambridge in the Hintze Hall
The Duchess of Cambridge in the Hintze Hall - (Copyright PA Media)
22:00pm, Tue 13 Oct 2020
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The Duchess of Cambridge has praised Wildlife Photographer of the Year award entrants for capturing the “magic of the natural world” as she unveiled the winner.

Kate announced that Russian photographer Sergey Gorshkov had scooped the prestigious Natural History Museum prize with his image The Embrace, showing a Siberian tigress hugging a fir tree.

The Embrace

The duchess thanked the 49,000 people who entered from across the globe for “reminding us that caring for our environment and its precious biodiversity has never been more important”.

She described the images as offering “a moving and fascinating insight into the beauty and vulnerability of life on our planet”.

Kate, patron of the museum and a keen photographer herself, was filmed in the London tourist attraction’s famous Hintze Hall.

She said during the online ceremony: “It is so wonderful to be back at the re-opened Natural History Museum where we can all enjoy its treasures once again.

Kate - (Copyright PA Media)

“I’m delighted to be announcing the Grand Title winner of the 56th Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition.

“As we have seen this evening, the competition attracts the very best in wildlife photography.

“The skill and creativity of this year’s images provide a moving and fascinating insight into the beauty and vulnerability of life on our planet.

“So, it is with great pleasure that I can announce this year’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year is: Sergey Gorshkov, for his image ‘The Embrace’.

“Many congratulations to you Sergey, and thank you to all of those who entered for showing us the magic of the natural world, and for reminding us that caring for our environment and its precious biodiversity has never been more important.”

Gorshkov’s image took more than 11 months to capture with hidden cameras.

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